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An Ichariba Choodee Pilot Mini-Series

Shimapod Headlines

Amplifying Okinawa Diaspora News

Haisai and welcome to our new project, Shimapod Headlines, a pilot mini-series in which we bring to you important news relating to Okinawa and the Ryukyus.  These mini-series episodes will be released on an ongoing basis as relevant news develops. 


Our intention for this mini-series is to create a platform in which our diasporic communities might continue to learn and grow by providing up-to-date, unbiased, and informative news that might otherwise be overlooked or inaccessible. 

 

As with many things relating to Okinawa, we acknowledge the complex and sensitive nature of the content that will likely come up in these episodes. The podcast stands firm in that it is our mission to provide an open and safe space for these challenging topics so that our diasporic communities might be informed and have the opportunity to engage with and learn from the content.  

We are delighted to bring in two new guest-hosts and newest additions to the Ichariba choodee team, Maia Hibbett and Kaiya YonamineTheir information can be found below.  We look forward to this evolving journey together. 

Yutashiku unigeesabira!

Headlines

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Shimapod Headline: Topic [date]

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Shimapod Headline: Topic [date]

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Shimapod Headline: Topic [date]

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About the mini-series guest-hosts

Maia Hibbett

Maia comes to us with a background in journalism; she previously worked at New York Magazine and The Nation, during where she wrote two powerful articles known to many in our community, “In Their Fight to Stop a New US Military Base, Okinawans Confront Two Colonizers,” and “In Okinawa, the US Military Seeks a Base Built on the Bones of the War Dead.

Maia is currently an Associate Editor at The Intercept and is a yonsei (or 4th generation) Okinawan-American. 

maia hibbett

Kaiya Yonamine

Kaiya is a 2nd gen Okinawan-American.  Wishing to bring awareness to the US military base relocation happening in Henoko not being covered by the media, Kaiya traveled to Okinawa in the spring of 2019 where she created the documentary ‘Our Island’s Treasure.  The documentary centers on the destruction of the beautiful Okinawan ocean in Henoko and the fight by the native Uchinanchu to protect it. She also has a website, Rise for Henoko,  where you can see the completed documentary as well as resources for action.  Kaiya is a current Journalism student enrolled in her second year at the University of Hawaii.

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